Search
Generic filters
Filter by Categories
dating violence
Children and Mental Health
Marissa Quint, MA, TLMFT

Protect Your Child from Teen Dating Violence

Roughly 1 in 13 teens reported experiencing physical dating violence in the last year alone. Much to the frustration of many parents, teens often look to peers rather than mom or dad to help them navigate changes and challenges they are experiencing in their lives. This includes challenges in their intimate relationships.

Read More 🠪
OCD
OCD
Leslie Orr, TLMHC

The Reality of Really Having OCD

Not all repetitive thoughts are obsessions and not all repetitive behaviors are compulsions. Many people worry or have routines… A person with OCD can’t just stop what they are doing because they get tired of it or it’s time to leave. If their obsessive thought was that “stepping on a crack would break their mother’s back,” they would continue to avoid all cracks in any surface walked on.

Read More 🠪
Depression
Mental Health Awareness
Amy Reihman, MS, LMHC

Just Feeling Down? Or are You Suffering from Depression?

You may be reading this — now knowing that depression is not as rare as you once thought — and wonder “Do I have depression?” One of the most common misconceptions that I hear is the idea that in order to have depression a person must feel sad all of the time or cry frequently. While this can be a symptom of depression, it is certainly not the only one.

Read More 🠪
voting booth
Relationships
Charlie White, TLMHC

How to Navigate Politics and Family Conflict

People tend to get particularly defensive when they feel outnumbered by those who do not share their view. In order to have a successful conversation, don’t go into it trying to change anyone’s mind. Rather, make it your goal to understand their view. “Help me understand your beliefs,” is a statement you could try. This might help the other person open up and realize they are not being attacked.

Read More 🠪
A message in hard times
Mental Health Awareness
Catherine Norwood, LMHC

A Message in Hard Times: Normalize Mental Health

This woman was so filled with shame. If shame were a color it would pour out of her eyes, staining her cheeks. I sat across from her letting my eyes fill as well. I could normalize her experience — not just because I am a trained therapist — but because I have thought those very same things too. If you are reading this, please help me to NORMALIZE MENTAL HEALTH.

Read More 🠪
paternal postnatal depression
Men's Mental Health
Nicholas D'Amico, MA, LMFT

New fathers can struggle with Postnatal Depression too.

For many men struggling with Paternal Postnatal Depression (PPND), the feelings of sadness quickly get entwined with other complicated emotions. In many situations this condition goes untreated. Men are often taught to hide sadness, pain, and other emotions. Expressing the feelings associated with PPND feels like weakness.

Read More 🠪
love yourself
Relationships
Jason Cleveland, MA, TLMFT

Love yourself, Love others, Be loved.

When our partner, friend, or loved one does something that “smells” like past wounds, our defenses go up. The fear of repeating the past comes out looking like anger. Even though we are wanting to be close with our loved ones (spouses, children, friends, and neighbors), old wounds — both emotional and physical — often stand in the way.

Read More 🠪
college during COVID-19
Mental Health Awareness
Leona Childs, MA, LMHC

The Challenge of Adjusting to College during COVID Times

Adjusting to college is hard enough without adding the curveball of COVID into the mix. You may be someone who welcomed the changes brought on by the pandemic. The reality is some people are ok with or even prefer the “new normal” and others do not. The truth is that it is okay to not be okay AND it’s also okay to be okay.

Read More 🠪
prevent suicide
Suicide
Kaitlin Lubahn, MA, LMFT

You CAN Help Prevent Suicide

Ask, “Are you thinking of killing yourself?” This may seem like a difficult question and many fear that asking someone this question will put thoughts of suicide into their minds, but research indicates that asking individuals that are at risk of suicide does not increase the chance of suicide attempts or suicidal thoughts.

Read More 🠪
cancer
Children and Mental Health
Tara Roberts

The Mental Toll of Having a Child with Cancer

I can remember that day like it was yesterday, it was July 20, 2017 and my son’s doctor said the words no parent ever wants to hear, “Your child has cancer.” Hearing those words brought me to my knees. My 7-year-old baby, Kameron, had been diagnosed with stage 3 Hodgkin’s Lymphoma.

Read More 🠪
ADHD
Children and Mental Health
Dani Darbyshire, MSN, ARNP

Understanding ADHD and Helping Your Child Thrive

How do you know if your child might have ADHD or if their behavior is typical, albeit a bit overly energetic? The answer is you don’t have to know. Parents and caregivers are not expected to know everything about their children.

Read More 🠪
suicide awareness
Suicide
Zara Teichrow, LMSW

Suicide is Not Painless

This week is National Suicide Prevention Week, but preventing suicide is a topic that should never drop out of the conversation — no matter what time of year it is. Suicide can be preventable, and it is important to take seriously. We can all play an important role in preventing suicide.

Read More 🠪
emotionally unavailable spouse
Relationships
Nicholas D'Amico, MA, LMFT

Are you Emotionally Available to Your Spouse?

We place our partners outside of an unbreakable wall of silence when we are not emotionally available. It’s hard to trust the fella on the other side of wall if he refuses to open the door. A lasting and durable trust can only built when both people are inside the walls.

Read More 🠪
back to school bus
Children and Mental Health
Erin Hill, LMHC

Surviving Back to School Stress

Some stress is necessary to motivate us to act. Think about the stress you might feel while preparing for a test. It can motivate you to study hard do well on the exam. However, too much stress can interfere with our daily life and performance and can lead to long-term health issues.

Read More 🠪
make lemonade out of lemons
Disaster Recovery
Christine Topping, MS, LMFT

Make Resilient Lemonade out of the Derecho

For all people, how we handle challenges has a lot to do with our ability to be resilient. Resiliency is like a rubber band, the more resilient you are, the springier your rubber band and the quicker you are able to rebound from a difficult event. As we continue to stretch our rubber band over and over as we go from pandemic to home schooling to natural disaster, the harder it has become for the rubber band to regain its original shape.

Read More 🠪
Derecho
Disaster Recovery
Covenant Family Solutions

Free Mental Health Coaching to Iowans Impacted by Derecho

It is known that survivors of natural disasters have a 30 to 40 percent chance of suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). One thing that can be done to counteract the long-term mental health effects of a disaster is to seek help early and to talk about the experience with professionals that are trained to help.

Read More 🠪
Identity
Identity
Jane Markowitz, MA, LMSW

What is Identity?

It’s easy to feel lost or disconnected if you don’t understand your identities. As people, we have a strong need to belong, and identities can lead to a higher sense of belonging. Exploring your identities can be hard. Having a safe and comfortable space to do that hard work is so important.

Read More 🠪