Rachel Van Wickle, TLMFT

Rachel Van Wickle, TLMFT

Rachel has experience working with teens, individual adults, couples, and families. She helps people navigate managing depression, anxiety, mental health diagnoses, communication, and relational problems. Her work includes a specialized focus helping medical professionals and their families, as well as members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (LDS).

Whatever you’re experiencing be sure to take a moment to name and recognize the emotion, with curiosity, not judgement. The bottom line is that we are all going to have different emotional responses to the current crisis in front of us. As written by author Nicki Peverett, “we are in the same storm, but not in the same boat.”

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on pinterest
Share on reddit
Share on email
Please note, the information in this post is not a replacement for personal medical advice.

Today, I would like to share five steps on how to take care of your mental and emotional health during the COVID-19 pandemic. These are not normal times and it is important to be kind to ourselves as we cope with the current situation. Please know that  whatever emotional state you are in is ok. I think right now a lot of people are feeling very alone in their experiences.

Whatever you’re feeling be sure to take a moment to name and recognize the emotion, with curiosity, not judgement. The bottom line is that we are all going to have different emotional responses to the current crisis in front of us. As written by author Nicki Peverett, “we are in the same storm, but not in the same boat.” 

We are in the same storm, but in different boats.

I hope these tips help you feel a bit more in control of your mental and emotional health during COVID-19 and guides you in a helpful way. Remember — we are all in the same storm but are in different boats. Your experience is your experience. It’s ok if your process looks different from another person. Be sure to acknowledge and name your emotions, connect with others, utilize your coping skills, work to make the ordinary extraordinary, and create something to look forward to in the future.

If you’re feeling particularly overwhelmed at this time, are struggling with tasks of daily living, experiencing depressive or suicidal states, panic attacks, or other distressing symptoms, please reach out for help. You don’t have to go through this alone. Our team at Covenant Family Solutions is here for you and we are prepared to support you in any way we can. If you or a loved one are in need of an appointment, please reach out. Thank you and take care.

Related Articles

dating violence
Children and Mental Health
Marissa Quint, MA, TLMFT

Protect Your Child from Teen Dating Violence

Roughly 1 in 13 teens reported experiencing physical dating violence in the last year alone. Much to the frustration of many parents, teens often look to peers rather than mom or dad to help them navigate changes and challenges they are experiencing in their lives. This includes challenges in their intimate relationships.

Read More »
OCD
OCD
Leslie Orr, TLMHC

The Reality of Really Having OCD

Not all repetitive thoughts are obsessions and not all repetitive behaviors are compulsions. Many people worry or have routines… A person with OCD can’t just stop what they are doing because they get tired of it or it’s time to leave. If their obsessive thought was that “stepping on a crack would break their mother’s back,” they would continue to avoid all cracks in any surface walked on.

Read More »
Depression
Mental Health Awareness
Amy Reihman, MS, LMHC

Just Feeling Down? Or are You Suffering from Depression?

You may be reading this — now knowing that depression is not as rare as you once thought — and wonder “Do I have depression?” One of the most common misconceptions that I hear is the idea that in order to have depression a person must feel sad all of the time or cry frequently. While this can be a symptom of depression, it is certainly not the only one.

Read More »