Category: Overcoming Trauma

DID
Blog

How to Understand and Treat Dissociative Identity Disorder

When trauma happens, especially to a child, it is natural for them to envision it as happening to someone else. This is where dissociation comes in. The brain learns that when there is a negative feeling, thought, or event, it can cope by creating distance. Individuals with DID use this emotional and physical distance to get through traumatic experiences.

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Children and Mental Health
Blog

Why Therapy is Great for Children and Mental Health

Children are resilient. If they experience a traumatic event, it does not mean they have to be affected now or later in life. They can recover. It is important to recognize the signs of mental health problems and try to get your child help before these events impact them even more.

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Blog

What You Need to Know About Self-Harm

When people are faced with intense mental distress, the result can be hard to predict. In some cases, emotional suffering can lead to self-harm. One common example of this is cutting. It is important to note that self-harming is distinct from attempting suicide, or even feeling suicidal.

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Trauma
Blog

Trauma Impacts the Mind AND the Body

I often hear people say, “My experience is not as bad as someone else’s experience, so I have no reason to feel this way.” This type of thinking can slow the healing process, because when we invalidate our own trauma, we’re essentially locking ourselves up with our own shame and throwing away the key. It’s important to consider that your trauma is your own.

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Adult Bullies
Blog

How to Handle Adults That Bully Others

When we think of bullying, we typically envision the kid stealing lunch money or shoving their peer to the ground at recess. Sure, these are the most common depictions of bullying in pop culture, but bullying doesn’t end when we graduate high school. So how can we handle adults who bully us?

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love yourself
Blog

Love yourself, Love others, Be loved.

When our partner, friend, or loved one does something that “smells” like past wounds, our defenses go up. The fear of repeating the past comes out looking like anger. Even though we are wanting to be close with our loved ones (spouses, children, friends, and neighbors), old wounds — both emotional and physical — often stand in the way.

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