How to Identify Signs of a Substance Use Disorder

Substance use disorders can impact anyone

When people think of a Substance Use Disorder (SUD), they often picture someone who is down on their luck. For example, they might think of someone who is homeless, unemployed, has health problems or is in legal trouble.

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on pinterest
Share on reddit
Share on email
Please note, the information in this post is not a replacement for personal medical advice.
By Debra Prier

When people think of a Substance Use Disorder (SUD), they often picture someone who is down on their luck. For example, they might think of someone who is homeless, unemployed, has health problems or is in legal trouble. Unfortunately, these stereotypes fuel the stigma around substance use disorders. In reality, those circumstances make up only a very small percentage of SUD cases. In fact, substance use disorders can affect people of all ages, genders, ethnicities, and social classes. Most people tend to function very well at first with limited negative consequences. Most seek help on their own through counseling or self-help groups.

What is a Substance Use Disorder? 

When someone is experiencing symptoms resulting from using alcohol or drugs and they continue to use despite experience the following:

Increasing substance use and frequency

In other words, if someone only wanted to drink four beers and they ended up drinking ten. Similarly, if their intention was to stay for one hour and they end up closing the bar down. Further, they miss their daughter’s basketball game. 

Wanting to cut down or stop, but not managing to

For example, if they tell themselves they are only going to drink three beers and every time they consume 12 instead. Or, if they tell themselves that they are not going to drink at all and then end up drinking. 

Spending a lot of time getting, using, or recovering

Always thinking about how they are going to get their substance of choice, or recovering from the “night before”. Including missing other obligations to recover.

Prioritizing the substance over other responsibilities

Not managing to do what they should at work, home, or school because of substance use. Or, completely missing work, missing deadlines, not going to family functions, or using instead of studying or going to classes. 

Continuing to use, even when it causes problems in relationships

Giving up important social, occupational, or recreational activities because of substance use. Also, not attending an event because they know that their drug of choice won’t be there. 

Continuing to use, even when it puts them in physical danger 

If they have a physical or psychological problem and continue to use the substance despite worsening conditions. For instance, if a professional tells them that their liver will continue to be damaged, but they drink anyway.

Cravings and withdrawal 

Sometimes those experiencing a substance use disorder can’t stop thinking about it. Even when they are supposed to be thinking about other things. Another example is increasing the amount or frequency to get the effect they want (tolerance). For instance, if it only took five beers to feel drunk in the past, but now it takes 12 beers. In addition, withdrawal symptoms might occur. This includes having tremors or seizures if they don’t drink. When they do drink the tremors or seizures go away. 

What are the treatment options? 

It can be scary to ask for help. However, it is a very courageous thing to do. One option is treatment from a therapist with experience in substance use disorders. After an initial consultation, the therapist will work with you to come up with a treatment plan. Then they will guide you as you navigate and implement the plan. Additionally, having a great support system is really helpful when overcoming a substance use disorder.

Click here for additional resources on substance use disorders. Additionally, if you are interested in our self-guided courses, visit selfhelp.strengthenu.com!

Author

Debra Prier
Debra Prier
Debra has worked in the nonprofit realm for over 20 years with a focus in the addictions field. In her former role she was an Executive Director in an outpatient substance use disorder treatment center. As a result of her expertise, she has presented at several national and state conferences on the topic of Addictions.
Additional Tips
Debra Prier
Debra Prier
Debra has worked in the nonprofit realm for over 20 years with a focus in the addictions field. In her former role she was an Executive Director in an outpatient substance use disorder treatment center. As a result of her expertise, she has presented at several national and state conferences on the topic of Addictions.
Translate

Get Mental Health Tips in your inbox!

Subscribe to be the first to receive our latest mental health tips and tools for strengthening your life!

By submitting this form you are agreeing to receive emails from Covenant Family Solutions. This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.